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Verona, Italy - attractions with photos, what to see

Unfortunately, the Verona Amphitheater is not among the objects that can be visited on a combined ticket. For this you have to pay separately and not so little. :(
The amphitheater of Verona is the third largest Roman amphitheater, it could accommodate about 30 thousand spectators. Once the amphitheater was outside the city, but now it is the central square of Verona - Piazza Bra.
The Romans, in contrast to the Greeks, preferred the rougher entertainments to the theater itself — gladiatorial fights and other battles, for which the amphitheater was built. Nevertheless, the acoustics here are excellent and concerts and performances are still held in the amphitheater.

 

 Verona. Roman Amphitheater of Verona

Roman Amphitheater of Verona
Arena di Verona (I century)

 

 Verona. Roman Amphitheater of Verona

Roman Amphitheater of Verona
Arena di Verona (I century)

 

There was also a Roman theater in Verona - it was discovered in 1830 when clearing the territory from old buildings. It is located on the other side of the Adige, at the river itself, at the foot of the hill of St. Peter. There is not much left of the theater - there are places for the audience, part of the stage and fragments of the surrounding buildings.
Here are located (built much later, of course) the monastery of St. Girolamo and the church of St. Syrus and St. Libera.

 

 Verona. Roman theater, monastery of St. Girolamo, church of St. Syrus and Libera

Roman theater, monastery of St. Jerome, church of St. Syrus and Libera
Teatro Romano, convento di San.Girolamo

 

 Verona. Roman theater

 Roman theater
 Teatro Romano  (I century)

 

Monks of the monastery of St. Jerome (San Girolamo) was famous for the manufacture of local herbs with medicines, until Napoleon secularized their possessions. Now here is the archaeological museum.

 

 Verona. Monastery of St. Jerome

Monastery of St. Jerome
Сonvento di San.Girolamo (XVI century)

 

Church of St. Syrus appeared here before the monastery in the tenth century. In the XIV century it was significantly rebuilt and dedicated to St. Libera.

 

 Verona. Church of St. Syrus and St. Libera

Church of St. Syrus and St. Libera
Chiesa di San Siro e San Libera  (X-XIV century)

 

The construction of the Roman Theater was preceded by the construction of a bridge over the Adige River. In Roman times, it was called Marmoreus, and then it was calledPonte Pietra, literally - the bridge-stone. In the Middle Ages, it was a distinctive quality - not every city could boast of a stone bridge. The retreating fascists, among others, blew up the Roman bridge. It was restored in the same way as the Skaligers Bridge - in accordance with the photos from debris caught from the river.
Ponte Pietra consists of two parts, the Roman - large stone blocks, and the medieval - terracotta bricks based on all the same Roman blocks. The reason for this is numerous destructions, mainly from floods.

 

 Verona. Roman Bridge - Ponte Pietra

Roman Bridge - Ponte Pietra
Ponte Pietra (I в.до н.э.)

 

Another important monument of the Roman era is the Gavi Arch. This is a triumphal arch built on the Postumian road (via Postumia) in honor of the local noble family of Gavia. In the niches were statues of family members, and under the niches are inscriptions with their names. On the inside of one of the columns, the name of the architect (Lucius Vetruvia) is stamped - a rarity for Roman buildings.
In the Middle Ages, the arch was built into the city wall.
In 1805, the arch was demolished by Napoleonic engineers, apparently for the purpose of restoration, since by that time it had more than half grown into the ground. The restoration did not take place, but the disassembly work was carried out carefully and the blocks were deposited. Thanks to this, the Gavi arch was restored in the same form, but in a slightly different place (1932), since the old place was the carriageway (this is the road before entering Castelvecchio - there is still a white rectangle there ).
Now the arch stands on the ancient Roman basalt pavement next to Castelvecchio.

 

 Verona. Gavi Arch

Gavi Arch
Arco dei Gavi (I century)

 

 Verona. Gavi Arch

Gavi Arch
Arco dei Gavi (I century)

 

The city walls of Verona were built in different places and at different times - from the Romans to the Austrians.

From the oldest wall, the Roman, there are only the Borsari gates and the Leoni gates. The latter are a rather inconspicuous arch leaning against the wall of the house.
The Gate of Borsari is much better preserved, although this is only the facade of the building that once stood here, through which the entrance to the city was laid. And in the building there was security and other services.

 

 Verona. Gate of Borsari

Gate of Borsari
Porta Borsari (XIII century)

 

From the bridge of Aleardi to the amphitheater there is a well-preserved fragment of the wall of the XIII century with towers and gates.

 

 Verona. City wall

City wall
Cinta muraria (XIII century)

 

 Verona. City wall and gate Chitadella

City wall and gate Chitadella
Porta Citadella (XIII century)

 

 Verona. Portoni della Brà

Portoni della Brà
I portoni della Brà (XIII century)

 

The della Scala family (or the Scaligers) rule Verona for more than a century, from 1260 to 1387. In recent years, their main residence was in the castle of San Martino al Ponte (after the name of the nearest church, which was not preserved). The castle was built in record time - from 1354 to 1376. Its internal structures include the remains of the old roman city walls. These inclusions are very clearly visible - large white stone blocks in the walls of red brick.
After the construction of a new castle on the hill of St. Peter (XV century), this fortress was called the Old Castle - Castelvecchio.
During the Venetian period, Castelvecchio was used as the residence of castellan, barracks, artillery arsenal, armory, powder shop, food warehouse. Part of the fortress was taken to prison.

 

 Verona.Castelvecchio and the Scaligero Bridge

Castelvecchio and the Scaligero Bridge
Castelvecchio (XIV century)

 

 Verona. Castelvecchio and the Scaligero Bridge

Castelvecchio and the Scaligero Bridge
Castelvecchio (XIV century)

 

The bridge, which does not directly connect with the city, but leads only to the castle, was built as an escape route in case of an uprising in the city.
In 1945, the retreating Germans blew up all the bridges in Verona. The Scaligers Bridge was restored in accordance with the photos using fragments that fell into the river.

 

 Verona. Scaligers Bridge

Scaligers Bridge
Ponte di Castelvecchio - Ponte Scaligero (XIV century)

 

Initially, the premises inside the castle adjoined only the outer wall (on the Adige River). The white building was built in the 18th century, with the aim of expanding the military school that was located here.

 

 Verona. Кастельвеккьо

Castelvecchio
Castelvecchio (XIV century)

 

 Verona. Castelvecchio

Castelvecchio
Castelvecchio (XIV century)

 

 Verona. Castelvecchio. Main gate

Castelvecchio. Main gate
Castelvecchio - L'ingresso (XIV century)

 

 Verona. Castelvecchio

Castelvecchio
Castelvecchio (XIV century)

 

The top of the hill of St. Peter is surrounded by the walls of the Scaligers, who, once surrounded the castle. Now on the hill are only remnants of the Austrian barracks and public park, although, by old memory, this place is called the castle of St. Peter .

 

 Verona. Hill of St. Peter

Hill of St. Peter
Castel San Pietro

 

For obvious reasons, the fortifications built by the Austrians, who, in turn, used the defenses of the previous owners of the city, the Venetians, were best preserved. For example, the bastion of St. George is entirely Venetian, while the neighboring Trento gate was built into the wall by Austrians.

 

 Verona. Bastion of St. George

Bastion of St. George
Bastione di San Giorgio (XIX century)

 

 Verona. Trento Gate

 Trento Gate
Porta di Trento (XIX century)

 

 Verona. Austrian walls

Austrian walls
Muro austriaca (XIX century)

 

 Verona. Austrian walls

Austrian walls
Muro austriaca (XIX century)

 

 Verona. Arsenal

Arsenal
Arsenale (XIX century)

 

 Verona. Veskovo Gate

Veskovo Gate
Porta Vescovo (XIX century)

 

The central squares of Verona are Piazza Signoria or Dante (Piazza dei Signori) and Piazza delle Erbe. Here were the administrative and representative buildings, as well as the palaces of the Veronese nobility. The square also bears the name of Dante, since he lived in the palace of Podesta after his expulsion from Florence. In the center of the square is the statue of Dante.

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Palace of Justice and the House of Pieta

Signoria Square. Palace of Justice and the House of Pieta (just the house :)
Piazza dei Signori. Domus Nova, Casa della Pietà (XIV-XVI century)

 

The Palace Loggia del Consiglio was commissioned by the municipality of Verona to hold council meetings.

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Loggia del Consiglio

Signoria Square. Loggia del Consiglio
Piazza dei Signori. Loggia del Consiglio o Loggia di Fra Giocondo (XV century)

 

The Palazzo del Podesta (Government Palace, the podesta is the head of the city administration) was built over the Roman ruins by the Scaligerians. The portal appeared two centuries later.

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Palazzo del Podesta

Signoria Square. Palazzo del Podesta
Piazza dei Signori. Domus Nova, Palazzo del Podestà (XIV-XVI century)

 

Palace of Cancignorio della Scala, also called Palazzo del Capitanio, was originally a palace-fortress with three large towers at the corners of the building. In some documents it is called Palazzo Grande.

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Palace Cancignorio

Signoria Square. Palace Cancignorio
Piazza dei Signori. Palazzo di Cansignorio (XIV-XVI century)

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Palace Cancignorio

Signoria Square. Palace Cancignorio
Piazza dei Signori. Palazzo di Cansignorio (XIV century)

 

Palace della Ragione was originally a private building built near the Roman Forum. For centuries, there were various political and administrative institutions in the palace. The current name of the palace is from 1493, when the city court entered here.
The tower was built by the influential Lamberti family in the 11th century. From this tower remains the base, which is distinguished by the alternation of terracotta and tuff tiles. The rest of the construction of the XVI century.

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Palazzo della Ragione and Lamberti Tower

Signoria Square. Palazzo della Ragione and Lamberti Tower
Piazza dei Signori. Palazzo della Ragione, Torre dei Lamberti  (XII-XVIII century)

 

 Verona. Signoria Square. Palazzo della Ragione

Signoria Square. Palazzo della Ragione
Piazza dei Signori. Palazzo della Ragione, Torre dei Lamberti  (XII-XVIII century)

 

Piazza delle Erbe (Grass Square) is located on the site where the Roman Forum was once. In the middle of the square there is a fountain with a statue of the Veronese Madonna, in which the Madonna is represented by a Roman statue of the 4th century.
On the north side of the square are the Maffei Palace and the Tower of the Gardello (Clock Tower). In front of the palace is the Venetian lion of St. Mark on the column.

 

 Verona. Piazza delle Erbe. Torre del Gardello (Clock Tower) and the Maffei Palace

Piazza delle Erbe. Torre del Gardello (Clock Tower) and the Maffei Palace
Piazza delle Erbe. Torre del Gardello (XIV-XVII century), Palazzo Maffei  (XV-XVII century)

 

Domus Mercatorum is the house of merchants' guilds. It was often rebuilt, but at the end of the XIX century restorers returned to him the original appearance.

 

 Verona. Piazza delle Erbe. Domus Mercatorum

Пьяцца делле Эрбе. Домус Меркаторум
Piazza delle Erbe. Domus Mercatorum  (XIV-XIX century)

 

The houses of Mazzanti are exactly the houses, and, not one house, and, initially, the houses are not residential - they were used as warehouses. Mazzanti is the name of the last owners. In these houses interesting frescoes preserved on them. In the XIV-XVI centuries in Italy, houses were often decorated with frescoes, but in Verona it was so common that it was called "the city of paintings". The Mazzanti houses are an example of what was one of the peculiarities of Verona in the past.

 

 Verona. Дома Маццанти и Веронская Мадонна

Piazza delle Erbe. Houses Mazzanti and Veronese Madonna
Piazza delle Erbe. Case Mazzanti, Madonna Verona

 

And finally, the "main" attractions of Verona.
On the house of the Cappello family (a prototype of Capuletti) there hangs a modest tablet mentioning Juliet as the character of "many poetic works" and in no way mentioning Shakespeare. Apparently, this excitement around the "places of residence" of non-existent persons, the people of Verona themselves do not really like. This, however, does not prevent the crowds of tourists from gathering near the "Juliet's house" and yelling from the notorious balcony, which, by the way, did not exist on the original house at all. This, like many other things, is the result of the restoration of the mid-twentieth century, which was precisely designed to give the dilapidated house the features familiar from the play of Shakespeare and the movies.
The entrance, of course, is not free.

 

 Verona. Cappello House - "Juliet's House"

Cappello House - "Juliet's House"
Casa dei Capuleti - casa Giulietta (XIII-XIV century)

 

"Romeo’s House" has a smaller relationship to Shakespeare’s Romeo than Juliet’s House to Juliet. This is the palace of the Nogarola family, with which, it is true, there is a certain legend about the beloved - also tragically ended, but with a completely different plot. And from the genus Nogarola was just a girl. This, of course, would not hurt to arrange a "Romeo museum" here, but the house is privately owned and the owners are totally against it.

 

 Verona. Nogarola Palace - "Romeo House"

Nogarola Palace - "Romeo House"
Casa di Cagnolo Nogarola detto Romeo (XIV century)

 

So called "Juliet's Tomb" is in a formerFranciscan monastery. It is considered such on the grounds that there were crypts near the outer wall of the monastery, among which were, the tombs of the Capuletti family. This, of course, is pure fiction, since such a family never existed. The information is taken from the novel “the inventor” of the images of Romeo and Juliet Luigi da Porto “The Newly Found History of Two Noble Lovers” (1524). The novella was very popular and, almost immediately, a pilgrimage began to one of the sarcophagi. The church authorities did not like this, since it was very much like the worship of holy relics, and the sarcophagus was adapted for storing water. In the XIX-XX centuries it was transferred several times until it was installed in a newly-formed museum of frescoes, creating, especially for a tomb, a room resembling a crypt.

 Verona. Juliet's tomb

Juliet's tomb
Tomba di Giulietta

 

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