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Description, how to get Attractions

Milan, Italy - attractions

 

Milan for tourists can be safely divided into two unequal parts - the Cathedral and everything else. Not because in Milan, except for the Duomo, nothing deserves attention, but because the majority of tourists crowd in the main square and they don’t need anything else. At least, I got the impression. Well, the Sforza Castle there are many visitors. All other attractions that I visited were virtually deserted.
Milan Cathedral (Duomo) - one of the largest in Europe. In Italy, it is inferior in capacity (40,000 people) only to the Vatican church of Sts. Peter. The cathedral constracted until the beginning of the nineteenth century - six centuries. The cathedral is really very beautiful, but because of the huge number of people, it is impossible normally to inspect it, not to mention getting inside or going upstairs - you need to stand in line many hours. So I walked around, looked at what I could, and walked on.

 

 Milan Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary

Milan Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary
Duomo di Milano - Cattedrale di Santa Maria Nascente  (XIV-XIX century)

 

 Milan Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary

Milan Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary
Duomo di Milano - Cattedrale di Santa Maria Nascente  (XIV-XIX century)

 

 Milan Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary

Milan Cathedral of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary
Duomo di Milano - Cattedrale di Santa Maria Nascente  (XIV-XIX century)

 

From Milano Central Station to the Duomo walk about half an hour. On the way you can see several attractions.
The Porta Nuovo gate is part of an old city wall built in the time of Friedrich Barbarossa from the remains of Roman fortifications. Facing was performed three centuries later.

 

 Milan  Porta Nuovo

Porta Nuovo
Archi di Porta Nuovo (XII-XV century)

 

At the Piazza della Scala is the famous Opera House and the gallery of Victor Emmanuel II.

 

 Milan  La Scala Theater

La Scala Theater
Teatro alla Scala (XVIII century)

 

In the Gallery of Victor Emmanuel II is a shopping center. Strictly speaking, for this it was built.

 

 Milan  Victor Emanuel II Gallery

Victor Emanuel II Gallery
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II (XIX century)

 

 Milan Victor Emanuel II Gallery

Victor Emanuel II Gallery
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II (XIX century)

 

The gallery goes directly to the Piazza Duomo. After exploring the Cathedral, you can move towards the next sign landmark of Milan - the Sforza Castle. It is close, about 15 min. on foot.
The adjacent square is Piazza Mercanti (merchants) with the Palazzo Affari (or lawyers). In the Middle Ages, the city center was located here. The building was built for a school of politicians and lawyers, then used as a stock exchange, telegraph, bank. Now here is the Chamber of Commerce.

 

 Milan  Palace of Lawyers

Palace of Lawyers
Palazzo Affari ai Giureconsulti (XVI century)

 

Then you can go directly to the castle, but it is better to deviate a little to the right and first examine the surroundings.
Church of st. Thomas in Teramare is known from the XI century. The present building is the result of reconstruction in 1576. The facade was added in 1827.

 

 Milan Church of st. Thomas

Church of st. Thomas
Chiesa di San Tommaso in Terramara (XVI-XIX century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Thomas

Church of st. Thomas
Chiesa di San Tommaso in Terramara (XVI-XIX century)

 

Church of st. Mary was the center of the Carmelite monastery. Now the gallery with columns is adjacent to the church - either left over from the monastery, or originally owned by the church. The facade in the style of the Lombard gothic was added four centuries later after the construction of the church.

 

 Milan Church of st. Maria del Carmine

Church of st. Maria del Carmine
Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine (XV-XIX century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Maria del Carmine

Church of st. Maria del Carmine
Chiesa di Santa Maria del Carmine (XV-XIX century)

 

Since this was the very center of Milan, there was a palace of some noble family on almost every street. Usually, the street is called by the name of the Palazzo.

 

 Milan Kusani Palace

Kusani Palace
Palazzo Cusani (XVIII century)

 

The Palace of Brera was built for a Jesuit college, Brera is the name of the area. After the ban of the Society of Jesus, the building served as a library, and in 1776 the Academy of Fine Arts was founded here. Under Napoleon, many paintings from Italian churches were brought to the palace, which marked the beginning of the existence of one of the largest art galleries in Milan.

 

 Milan Pinocoteca Brera

Pinocoteca Brera
Palazzo (Pinacoteca) di Brera (XVI-XVII century)

 

 Milan Pinocoteca Brera

Pinocoteca Brera
Palazzo (Pinacoteca) di Brera (XVI-XVII century)

 

Church of st. Mark - the second largest in Milan (after the Duomo, of course), thanks to the fact that in the XVII century to the existing Gothic church was attached the second part - the baroque.

 

 Milan Church of st. Mark

Church of st. Mark
Chiesa di San Marco (XIII-XVII century)

 

Church of San Simpliciano stands on the site of the previous, founded by St.Ambrose and finished his follower of St. Simplicianus of Milan, who was then buried in this church. The current appearance of the building is the result of the restructuring of the XI-XIII centuries and renovation of the facade in 1870

 

 Milan Church of st. Simplician

Church of st. Simplician
Basilica di San Simpliciano (XI-XIX century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Simplician

Church of st. Simplician
Basilica di San Simpliciano (XI-XIX century)

 

From the church, you can get to Castello Sforzesco through the side entrance (Carmini Gate).
The castle was built in the XIV century as the residence of the Dukes of Milan from the Visconti clan. In 1447, a dynastic crisis erupted and the fortress was destroyed in the ensuing riots. Three years later, the son-in-law of the last Visconti, Francesco Sforza, came to power and rebuilt the castle. Part of the work carried out by Leonardo da Vinci.
This building was a model for Italian architects who built the Moscow Kremlin.
In the nineteenth century two major restorations were carried out.
Now there are several museums in the castle. The entrance to the territory is free, but museums is not free (for all the museums of the castle a single ticket).

 

 Milan Sforza Castle - Karmini Gate

Sforza Castle - Karmini Gate
Castello Sforzesco (XIV-XV century)

 

 Milan Sforza Castle

Sforza Castle
Castello Sforzesco (XIV-XV century)

 

 Milan Sforza Castle

Sforza Castle
Castello Sforzesco (XIV-XV century)

 

 Milan Sforza Castle

Sforza Castle
Castello Sforzesco (XIV-XV century)

 

 Milan Sforza Castle - Filarete Tower

Sforza Castle - Filarete Tower
Castello Sforzesco - Torre del Filarete (XIV-XV century)

 

 Milan Sforza Castle - Filarete Tower

Sforza Castle - Filarete Tower
Castello Sforzesco - Torre del Filarete (XIV-XV century)

 

Then you can explore the western surroundings of the castle.

The church of Santa Maria delle Grazie was part of the Dominican monastery. It is famous for the fact that in the refectory of this monastery is located one of the most famous frescoes of the world - "The Last Supper" by Leonardo da Vinci. Previously, there was also the altar of the work of Titian, but he was taken away by French troops in 1797 - he is now in the Louvre.
Just look at the interior of the church is very difficult. At the time of my visit the doors were closed. Then I read that, in particular, to visit the refectory with the Last Supper you need to sign up for three months (not for free, of course), and not the fact that it will work out.

 

 Milan Church of st. Maria della Grazie

Church of st. Maria della Grazie
Santa Maria delle Grazie (XVI century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Maria della Grazie

Church of st. Maria della Grazie
Santa Maria delle Grazie (XVI century)

 

Church of st. Vittore belonged to the Olivetans monastery (a branch of the Benedictines). Part of the monastic buildings are preserved.
During excavations in the courtyard of the monastery, found the remains of the fence the Roman mausoleum of the 4th century, in which the emperors Gratian and Valentinian II were buried. In ancient Mediolanum this place was located outside the city walls. In the IX century the mausoleum was turned into a chapel, and in the XVI century demolished for the construction of the present church.
Such a nondescript exterior of the church is explained by the fact that the facade remained unfinished. The main thing is inside - a stunning vaulted ceiling and the inner part of the dome, covered with frescoes.

 

 Milan Church of st. Vittore

Church of st. Vittore
San Vittore al Corpo (XVI-XVII century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Vittore

Church of st. Vittore
San Vittore al Corpo (XVI-XVII century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Vittore

Church of st. Vittore
San Vittore al Corpo (XVI-XVII century)

 

The Ambrosian Basilica (Sant Ambrogio) was built in 379-386 by order of St. Ambrosius of Milan for the burial of the remains of the early Christian martyrs Gervasius and Protasius. Accordingly, the church the Basilica of the Martyrs. In 397, Ambrose himself was buried here and the church began to be named after him. In the XI, early XII century the church underwent a significant restructuring and acquired a long atrium and another tower (left, higher).

 

 Milan Ambrosian Basilica

Ambrosian Basilica
Basilica di Sant Ambrogio (XI-XII century)

 

 Milan Ambrosian Basilica

Ambrosian Basilica
Basilica di Sant Ambrogio (XI-XII century)

 

Church of st. Mauritius of the Dominican monastery consists of two parts - the smaller one, where parishioners prayed and the greater part for the monastery's sisters, who were forbidden to participate in the general worship service. For them, a window was cut through the altar through which sounds were heard. The church is richly decorated with frescoes, which is why it was called the "Milan Sistine Chapel".

 

 Milan Church of st. Mauritius

Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore
Chiesa di San Maurizio (XVI century)
 

 Milan Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore

Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore
Chiesa di San Maurizio (XVI century)

 

 Milan Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore

Church of San Maurizio al Monastero Maggiore
Chiesa di San Maurizio (XVI century)

 

The Monastery of Maggiore is already mentioned in documents in Carolingian times. During its construction, the existing Roman structures were used, in particular - the tower, wall sections and the square, which was originally part of the Roman Arena. Now in the buildings of the monastery is an archaeological museum.

In the polygonal tower, which is part of the wall of Maximian, a chapel was arranged, the frescoes of which were partially preserved.
 

 Milan Maggiore Monastery - Maximian Wall

Maggiore Monastery - Maximian Wall
Monastero Maggiore - mura di Massimiano (III-XIV century)

 

 Milan Maggiore Monastery - Polygonal Tower

Maggiore Monastery - Polygonal Tower
Monastero Maggiore - torre poligonale (III-XIV century)

 

The exposition of the museum is dedicated mainly to Roman art.

 

 Milan Roman tombstone

Roman tombstone
Sarcofago (I-II century)

 

 Milan Urn from Volterra

Urn from Volterra
Lastra di urna volterrana (II century)

 

 Milan Skifos (drinking bowl) from Puglia

Skifos (drinking bowl) from Puglia
Grande skyphos (IV century B.C.)

 

The church of San Sepolcro is not related to a saint with that name. :) Actually, such a person never existed, since "sepolkro" means burial. In this case, it is a reference to the Jerusalem Holy Tomb of the Lord. The church received its name in 1100 in commemoration of the first anniversary of the capture of Jerusalem by the Crusaders. Prior to this, for 70 years from the time of construction, the church was dedicated to St. Trinity.
Almost immediately after the renaming, two bell towers were added to the church. Subsequent restructuring focused mainly on the interior.

 

 Milan Holy Tomb Church

Holy Tomb Church
Chiesa del Santo Sepolcro (XI-XIX century)

 

 Milan Holy Tomb Church

Holy Tomb Church
Chiesa del Santo Sepolcro (XI-XIX century)

 

Church of st. Mary at st. Satiro owes its strange name to the legend, according to which a certain young man in the church of St. Satiro cut the picture "Madonna and Child" with a knife and real blood appeared on it. To accommodate this picture next to the old church was built the church of st. Mary

 

Milan Church of st. Mary at st. Satiro

Church of st. Mary at st. Satiro
Chiesa di Santa Maria presso San Satiro (X-XIX century)

 

Church of st. Eufemia was founded in the fifth century to store the relics of this saint, brought by the bishop from the Council of Chalcedon. In the thirteenth and fifteenth century, the church was radically rebuilt. In the nineteenth century, it was lengthened and received a new facade.

 

 Milan Church of st. Eufemia

Church of st. Eufemia
Basilica di Sant'Eufemia  (XV-XIX century)

 

Church of st. Maria dei Miracoli at st. Celsus is the “collaboration” of the two churches that we have already met in Milan. The situation here is similar - a new church was built to house the icon of St. Mary, and the old church remained at the cemetery.
Church of st. Celsus was very much rebuilt in the nineteenth century, in fact, only the bell tower remained unchanged.
St. Mary is one of the first fully renaissance churches in Milan.

 

 Milan Church of st. Maria dei Miracoli at st. Celsus

Church of st. Maria dei Miracoli at st. Celsus
Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Miracoli presso San Celso

 

 Milan Church of st. Celsus

Church of st. Celsus
Chiesa di San Celso (XI-XIX century)

 

 Milan Church of st. Maria

Church of st. Maria dei Miracoli
Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Miracoli (XVI-XVII century)

 

The Church of St. Eustorgius is named after the bishop of Milan of the mid-fourth century, who, according to legend, brought here from Constantinople the relics of the three kings who worshiped the infant Christ. Fragments of this church were found in the crypt of the current basilica.
The relics for a long time made the church a popular place of pilgrimage, for which, the building was even completely rebuilt. The only thing that survived from that church to this day is the apse.
In the XII century, conquered Milan Friedrich Barbarossa, transferred relics to Cologne Cathedral. In commemoration of this tragic event :), the bell tower of the church is crowned not with a cross, but with a star of David. By the way, the bell tower is also interesting because for the first time in Italy a clock was set on it.
In the thirteenth century, the basilica was given to the Dominicans, who in the following centuries rebuilt it significantly - in particular, they added chapels, including external.
The newest addition is the façade, which appeared in the nineteenth century.

 

 Milan Church of St. Eustorgius

Church of St. Eustorgius
Basilica di Sant'Eustorgio (XI-XIX century)

 

Basilica of st. Nazarius in Brolo also has a long history, but due to the rearrangements nothing remained of the original appearance. Its current form is close to the original, but in fact it is no longer the original building, but the result of the reconstruction of the mid-twentieth century.

 

 Milan Basilica of st. Nazarius

Basilica of st. Nazarius
Basilica di San Nazaro in Brolo (XI-XIX century)

 

Naturally, this is not all that is interesting in Milan. Nevertheless, I think this is enough to make sure that Milan is not only the capital of fashion, as many think. :)

 

Milan sightseeing map
Milan sightseeing map

 

Milan subway map
Milan subway map

 

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