Traveling World

Ghent, Belgium - attractions, pictures

Ghent (Gent) is the capital of the East Flanders region, the third largest city in Belgium, after Brussels and Antwerp (more than 240 thousand inhabitants). In addition, despite the fact that the sea is more than 20 km., this is a major seaport - the ships pass through a special canal.
In the Middle Ages Ghent long time was the second largest city in Europe (after Paris).

 

 Ghent.

Ghent

 

 Ghent.

Ghent

 

 Ghent.

Ghent

 

Abbey of St. Peter was located outside the city. It is known from the 7th century, but during the Reformation it was badly damaged and then it was restored almost from scratch. Now and from those buildings there were only fragments, only the church was entirely preserved.

 

 Ghent. Abbey of St. Peter

Abbey of St. Peter
Sint-Pietersabdij (XVI c.)

 

 Ghent. Church of Our Lady and St. Petrer

Church of Our Lady and St. Petrer
Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Sint-Pieterskerk (XVI c.)

 

 Ghent. Church of Our Lady and St. Petrer

Church of Our Lady and St. Petrer
Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Sint-Pieterskerk (XVI c.)

 

The Gererd Devil's Castle was the seat of the local burgraves of the Seeger. Gererd - one of this family, called the devil, either for his dark skin, or for features of character. :) Already in the XIV century the building passed into the ownership of the city and has been rebuilt many times. It is assumed that only part of the basement floor remained from the original building.

 

 Ghent. Gererd Devil's Castle

Gererd Devil's Castle
 Geeraard de Duivelsteen (XIII c.)

 

The Cathedral of Ghent has name not very famous saint - Bavo. This is a "local" saint, he dwelt in the abbey near Ghent, who after his death and canonization received his name (VII century).
The abbey gradually expanded until Emperor Charles V decided that he needed this land to build a castle and ordered the abbey to be destroyed (1540). Destroyed, still not completely and the remains of the abbey can be seen now. But from the castle there was nothing left - it was demolished in the XIX century.

 

 Ghent. Abbey of St. Bavo

Abbey of St. Bavo
Sint-Baafsabdij (X-XIIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Abbey of St. Bavo

Abbey of St. Bavo
Sint-Baafsabdij (X-XIIIc.)

 

To the church that stood in place of the present cathedral, some functions of the abolished abbey passed, which required her reorganization. In 1561 the Ghentian bishopric and the cathedra in the church of St. Bavo was established.

 

 Ghent. Cathedral of St. Bavo

Cathedral of St. Bavo
Sint-Baafskathedraal (XIV-XVII c.)

 

 Ghent. Cathedral of St. Bavo

Cathedral of St. Bavo
Sint-Baafskathedraal (XIV-XVII c.)

 

 Ghent. Cathedral of St. Bavo

Cathedral of St. Bavo
Sint-Baafskathedraal (XIV-XVII c.)

 

The construction of Belfry in Ghent was completed by 1380, but since then the upper part was constantly rebuilt, in order to add new bells. Now there are 54 bells!
At the foot of the tower is a building of cloth rows - that is, in essence the market. Naturally, there was still a place for warehouses, guards, etc.

 

 Ghent. Belfry

Belfry
Belfort (XIV c.)

 

 Ghent. Belfry and the cloth rows

Belfry and the cloth rows
Belfort (XIV в.) en Lakenhalle (XV в.)

 

Church of St. Nicholas it is example of the so-called. Scheld Gothic, featuring special turrets and building materials - a stone brought from Tournai along the Schelda.
The tower of the church performed the functions of Belfry and the observation point, until a separate building was built for this purpose.

 

 Ghent. Church of St. Nicholas

Church of St. Nicholas
Sint-Niklaaskerk (XIII-XV c.)

 Ghent. Church of St. Nicholas

Church of St. Nicholas
Sint-Niklaaskerk (XIII-XV c.)

 

The town hall of Ghent consists of two parts, built at different times - the older Gothic and new Renaissance. In my opinion, Gothic is more beautiful.

 

 Ghent. Ратуша

The town hall
Stadhuis (XVI-XVII c.)

 

The house with an uncomplicated name "Pinnacle" belonged to the guild of tanners. In the square there was a market and a bell on the tower announced its opening and closing.

 

 Ghent. "Pinnacle"

"Pinnacle"
Toreken (XV c.)

 

 Ghent. Friday Market Square

Friday Market Square
Vrijdagmarkt

 

The Church of St. James was many and haphazardly rebuilt, which in its appearance is very noticeable.

 

 Ghent. Church of St. James

Church of St. James
Sint-Jacobskerk (XIII-XIX c.)

 

 Ghent. Church of St. James

Church of St. James
Sint-Jacobskerk (XIII-XIX c.)

 

In Belgium and the Netherlands, there are complexes of houses, called Begijnhof (Béguinage), by the name of the beguine who lived there. Beguines is a religious organization, but not a monastic order, but simply an association of women who, however, led a way of life close to the monastic order. At the same time, they were poorly understood of religious dogmas, and, often, became distributors of heresy. As a consequence, not all countries accepted them, and in 1311 issued an official decree of the Pontifical Council on the prohibition of the Beguines communities.
After that, the Begijnhofs continued to be used for different purposes, most often as a so-called. "social" housing.
In Ghent three Begijnhof - up to two of them I did not get, but "Small" Begijnhof looked. Of the Beguines, of course, there was nothing left, they generally lived in wooden houses, and stone buildings began to be built only from the XVII century. The composition is quite typical - in the middle of the church with a small lawn, around the building, and all this is enclosed by a wall.

 

 Ghent. Small Begijnhof

Small Begijnhof
Klein Begijnhof

 

 Ghent. The Church of the Beguinage of Our Lady of Terre Hoyen

The Church of the Beguinage of Our Lady of Terre Hoyen
Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Ter Hoyen (XVII-XVIIIc.)

 

A large meat house is a meat market building and a butchers' guild. It existed on this place for a long time, a stone building was built in the XV century. In the XIX century the market moved to another place and the building was empty. On the eve of the World Exhibition in 1913, the meat house was repaired and a new market was created - a vegetable market.

 

 Ghent. A large meat house

A large meat house
Groot Vleeshuis (XVc.)

 

 Ghent. A large meat house

A large meat house
Groot Vleeshuis (XVc.)

 

The earl's castle in Ghent was formed simultaneously with the counts. :) These are the counts of Flanders. In the XI century the first stone building appeared - the tower. In the XIV century the castle looked almost the same as now. Count Louis II (1346-1384) seemed to be not comfortable enough and he moved out. After Louis, power in the county, through marriage with his only heiress Margarita, passed to the dukes of Burgundy. Those, of course, preferred to live in Dijon, and the castle remained only the administrative center of the county.

 

 Ghent. Earl's castle

Earl's castle
Gravensteen (XI-XIVc.)

 

 Ghent. Earl's castle

Earl's castle
Gravensteen (XI-XIVc.)

 

 Ghent. Earl's castle

Earl's castle
Gravensteen (XI-XIVc.)

 

Monastery of St. Stefan - this is the cradle of the Augustinians in the Netherlands. They settled in Ghent in the late 13th century. But that monastery was almost completely destroyed by Geuzen (who does not know who is it - read "Till Eulenspiegel" by Charles De Coster). In XVI century began to build a new monastery - at the expense of the city, because Philip II put the responsibility for the destruction of the city. In 1720 the construction ended with the erection of an impressive monastery library.

 

 Ghent. Monastery of St. Stefan

Monastery of St. Stefan
Augustijnenklooster Sint-Stefanus (XVII-XVIIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Monastery of St. Stefan

Monastery of St. Stefan
Augustijnenklooster Sint-Stefanus (XVII-XVIIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Monastery of St. Stefan

Monastery of St. Stefan
Augustijnenklooster Sint-Stefanus (XVII-XVIIIc.)

 

The monastery of the Carmelites was distinguished by the fact that it provides not only free access to the inner territory, but also cells for living. :)

 

 Ghent.Monastery of the Carmelites

Monastery of the Carmelites
Karmelietenklooster (XVIIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Monastery of the Carmelites

Monastery of the Carmelites
Karmelietenklooster (XVIIIc.)

 

Rabot (three towers) - the only thing left from the city wall of Ghent. Why this is called Rabot is unknown.

 

 Ghent. Rabot

Rabot
Rabot (XVc.)

 

Church of St. Mikhail was built in the mid-fifteenth century. In the first half of the XVI century the Reformation began and people were not up to building churches. Two centuries later the church was completed, but the tower remained unfinished.
The church has an interesting extension near the bridge - between the absolutely gothic buildings there is something like a chapel, decorated with a completely Slavic forehead in the form of a bulb. Where does this come from in Belgium?

 

 Ghent. Church of St. Mikhail

Church of St. Mikhail
Sint-Michielskerk (XV-XVIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Church of St. Mikhail

Church of St. Mikhail
Sint-Michielskerk (XV-XVIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Church of St. Mikhail

Church of St. Mikhail
Sint-Michielskerk (XV-XVIIc.)

 

 Ghent. Church of St. Mikhail

Church of St. Mikhail
Sint-Michielskerk (XV-XVIIc.)

 

Along the canal (along different shores) stretched medieval streets - Grass Street and Grain Street. Of course, not all houses are medieval, and those that are really old, were restored to the World Exhibition in 1913, it is not known with what degree of certainty. But it looks beautiful.

 

 Ghent. Grass Street and Grain Street

Grass Street and Grain Street
Graslei en Korenlei (XVIIIc.)

 

Ghent really liked me. Beautiful, interesting city.

 

Booking.com 

 

Tourist Map of Ghent's Attractions
Tourist Map of Ghent's Attractions

 

Coins of Flanders

 

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