Traveling World

Bruges, Belgium - attractions, pictures

 

Bruges (Brugge) - an ancient Flemish city, at one time, the richest in Europe, as it was the largest trade center. Now its population is slightly more than 100 thousand inhabitants.
Bruges is considered one of the most picturesque cities in Europe and it is really true. Without exaggeration, you can methodically bypass the quarter after quarter and photograph everything.


 Bruges

Bruges

 Bruges

Bruges

 Bruges

Bruges

 Bruges

Bruges

 

Three canals cross the city and one surrounds it. All channels are navigable. Naturally, in Bruges there are many bridges, some of them are drawbridges. It is believed that the name of the city comes from the word bridge (brug in Flemish).
Another channel connects Bruges with the sea, to which 12 km.

 

 Bruges. Channel

Channel

 

On the banks of the canal surrounding the city there are parks and paths for walks.
On one bank is a chain of mills. The St. Janusa (Sint-Janshuismolen) stands on this place since the XVIII century. Another mill, also old (Koeleweimolen), was transported to Bruges from another location. Both of them are active, in Sint-Janshuismolen you can go to see how it works. The other two mills are not that old.

 

 Bruges. Mill

Mill
Koeleweimolen (XVIII c.)

 

Since Bruges is surrounded by water, the city gates were located strictly along the perimeter of the bypass channel. Naturally, along the canal there was a city wall, but nothing remained of it.

The Smedenport Gate is decorated with a bronze skull in memory of the events of 1691, when during the siege of the city by French troops, a traitor was found here, who was intending to open the gate secretly. The Renegade was executed, the head was cut off and attached to the gate, and then replaced with a bronze skull.


 Bruges. Blacksmith gate

Blacksmith gate
Smedenpoort (XIV c.)

 

The donkeys (or Ostende) gates stand directly in the middle of the canal. The lower part survived from the fourteenth century, and the upper part was rebuilt in the 17th century.

 

 Bruges. Donkeys (or Ostende) gates

Donkeys (or Ostende) gates
Ezelpoort (XIV-XVII c.)

 Bruges. The Cross Gates

 The Cross Gates
Kruispoort (XV c.)

 Bruges. The Gent Gates

The Gent Gates
Gentpoort (XV c.)

 

The Cathedral of Bruges stands on the spot where several churches burned before him. He also burning, and already in the status of the cathedral, received in 1834, so that most of what we see now is the result of the restoration of the XIX century. The interior is not amazing, everything is quite ascetic.

 

 Bruges. Cathedral of Christ the Savior

Cathedral of Christ the Savior
Sint-Salvatorskathedraal (XIV-XIX c.)

 Bruges. Cathedral of Christ the Savior

Cathedral of Christ the Savior
Sint-Salvatorskathedraal (XIV-XIX c.)

 

In front of the cathedral - a strange construction - houses, consisting entirely of windows. All windows open, if desired, you can climb inside. :)

 

 Bruges. House-windows
House-windows

 

The main square, as well as it is supposed to the trading city - the Big Market. On it, in addition to the market itself, there are old houses, Belfry and the Government House of the Province.

 

 Bruges. The Big Market Square

The Big Market Square
Grote Markt

House of the Government of the province of West Flanders is no longer used for its intended purpose. It is beautiful, but not old, built instead of burned down in 1878.

 

 Bruges. House of the Government of the province

House of the Government of the province
Provinciaal Hof (XIX c.)

 

Belfry in Bruges is a real fortress. Historically, this place was a covered market. In the XIII century a tower was added to it, which was used for administrative purposes. In the XV century the market got massive walls. And before and after that, the tower burned several times and was restored, most recently in the XIX century, when the spire was replaced by a turret.

 

 Bruges. Belfry

Belfry
Belfort (XIII-XIX c.)

 Bruges. Belfry

Belfry
Belfort (XIII-XIX c.)

 

 Bruges. Belfry

Belfry
Belfort (XIII-XIX c.)

 

The Town Hall in Bruges  is located elsewhere - on the City Square (Burg Square), which, however, very close to the Market.
Here is the building of the city archive and the Basilica of the Blood of Christ.
The Town Hall is one of the oldest in Flanders. The oldest part is the facade.

 

 Bruges. Town Hall

Town Hall
Stadhuis (XV-XVII c.)

The building, which now the city archive, was previously used as a management of urban neighborhoods, then, as a court.

 

 Bruges. The city archive

The city archive
Stadsarchief (XVIII c.)

 

The basilica of the Blood of Christ is one of the symbols of Bruges.
In fact, it's not even immediately clear that this is a church - the building is clamped by neighboring houses, the bell tower is not visible, I do not know if it exists at all ... But everything is very beautiful - both the facade and, especially, the interior. Very elegant, just a riot of colors. The most cheerful church decoration I've ever seen.
There is a small museum, quite interesting.
As for the blood of Christ proper. It is assumed that the relic fell in Bruges after the pillage of the crusaders of Constantinople in 1203, where it was kept in the imperial palace. Now the blood vessel hangs in a special adaptation in the middle of the church.

 

 Bruges. The basilica of the Blood of Christ

The basilica of the Blood of Christ
Heilig-Bloedbasiliek (XII-XVI c.)

 Bruges. The basilica of the Blood of Christ

The basilica of the Blood of Christ
Heilig-Bloedbasiliek (XII-XVI c.)

 Bruges. The basilica of the Blood of Christ

The basilica of the Blood of Christ
Heilig-Bloedbasiliek (XII-XVI c.)

 Bruges. The basilica of the Blood of Christ

The basilica of the Blood of Christ
Heilig-Bloedbasiliek (XII-XVI c.)

The Church of Our Lady is the oldest and tallest building in the city.
In addition to the architectural merits (very diverse, it should be said, in spite of the general Gothic concept), the works of art stored here are attracted. The main thing - a sculpture of the Virgin and Child, the work of Michelangelo. I still liked triptychs, on which the middle part depicts some religious plot, and lateral - the client's family. :) Very vital.

 

 Bruges. The Church of Our Lady

The Church of Our Lady
Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk (XII-XV c.)

 Bruges. The Church of Our Lady

The Church of Our Lady
Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk (XII-XV c.)

 Bruges. The Church of Our Lady

The Church of Our Lady
Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk (XII-XV c.)

 Bruges. The Church of Our Lady

The Church of Our Lady
Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk (XII-XV c.)

 Bruges. Madonna of Michelangelo

Madonna of Michelangelo (center)
Madonna Michelangelo (1503-1505)

 Bruges. Церковь Богоматери

The Church of Our Lady
Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk (XII-XV c.)

Church of St. Jacob acquired the present appearance as a result of constant expansion. It all began with a small chapel, to which new premises were gradually built. In the XIX century, a large-scale restoration was carried out, the purpose of which was, if possible, to return the medieval elements.

 

 Bruges. Church of St. Jacob

Church of St. Jacob
Sint-Jakobskerk (XIII-XVIII c.)

 

The church of St. Valpurga belonged to a Jesuit monastery. Almost all the Jesuit churches that I saw are baroque. It is clear that in the XVII century there was such a fashion, but that all ... Apparently, there was a special order for the Order. :) That's what real discipline means.

 Bruges. The church of St. Valpurga
The church of St. Valpurga
Sint-Walburgakerk (XVII c.)

 Bruges.The church of St. Valpurga

The church of St. Valpurga
Sint-Walburgakerk (XVII c.)

 

The hospital of St. John is one of the oldest in Europe. In addition to the rooms for the sick, there was a monastery, the monks of which took care of the sick. Impressive complex.

 

 Bruges. The hospital of St. John

The hospital of St. John
Sint-Janshospitaal (XII-XVI c.)

 Bruges. The hospital of St. John

The hospital of St. John
Sint-Janshospitaal (XII-XVI c.)

 Bruges. The hospital of St. John

The hospital of St. John
Sint-Janshospitaal (XII-XVI c.)

The building with an extraordinary tower - the Burger Lodge, served as a meeting place for members of a certain society of the White Bear. So you can imagine how the burghers sat on the observation platform of the tower, admired the neighborhood and drank what they had there at that time. :) In fact, they were all the same merchants (one must assume, large wholesalers) who concluded deals here, while ships were unloaded nearby.
In the XVIII-XIX century the building passed into the possession of the Academy of Arts, then the State Archives.

 

 Bruges.Burger Lodge

Burger Lodge
Poortersloge (XIV-XV c.)

 

The almshouses are small houses, usually white, which were built by handicraft guilds or private individuals for the shelter of elderly people or widows who were left without funds. Naturally, they are not in one place and not the same type. Some of them are now being surrendered at a low price to the elderly.

 

 Bruges. The almshouses

The almshouses
Godshuizen (XIV-XVI c.)

Finally - more photos Bruges.

 

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.

 Bruges.
 

The only thing I did not like in Bruges was the information tourist service. It would be more accurate to say - her absence. On the map, which is given in the tourist office, not even all the attractions are marked. Directly on the objects, at best, there is a nameplate, without any additional information. And even this is not. For a city that is visited by huge crowds of tourists - just ashamed.
So, if you go to Bruges - pre-develop the routes yourself.

 

 

Booking.com  

 

Tourist attraction map Bruges
Tourist attraction map of  Bruges

Bruges center map
Bruges center map

 

Coins of Flanders

 


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