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Burgos, Spain - attractions, pictures

 

Burgos is not the largest city in Spain (about 180 thousand inhabitants), but it is the first capital of Castile and Leon (until 1208, when Alfonso VIII moved the courtyard to the newly conquered Valladolid).

 

 Burgos - Панорама Burgosа

 Panorama of Burgos

 

 Burgos - Religious procession during Holy Week

 Religious procession during Holy Week
Religious procession during the Holy Week (Semana Santa)

 

The main evidence of former greatness and, of course, the main attraction is the Burgos Cathedral.
The front door is the gate of the Virgin Mary, which is now considered part of the cathedral. Originally it was just a passage in the city wall, but it is also famous for what is mentioned in the main Spanish epic - "The Song of My Side". In the XIV century the arch was reconstructed (as it looked then, you can understand on its back side), and in the XVI century rebuilt the front facade. In this case, it is not necessary to regret it - it turned out very nicely.

 

 Burgos - The Gate of the Virgin Mary

The Gate of the Virgin Mary
Arco de Santa María (XIV-XVI century)

 

 Burgos - The Gate of the Virgin Mary

 The Gate of the Virgin Mary
Arco de Santa María (XIV-XVI century)

 

 Burgos - The Gate of the Virgin Mary

 The Gate of the Virgin Mary
Arco de Santa María (XIV-XVI century)

 

The Cathedral is huge.
Many diverse chapels, from medieval to the eighteenth century. In general, it is possible to devote a whole day to an inspection of the cathedral alone.

 

 Burgos - The Cathedral of Our Lady

 The Cathedral of Our Lady
Catedral de Santa María (XIII-XVIII century)

 

 Burgos -The Cathedral of Our Lady

The Cathedral of Our Lady
Catedral de Santa María (XIII-XVIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Cathedral of Our Lady

 The Cathedral of Our Lady
Catedral de Santa María (XIII-XVIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Cathedral of Our Lady

The Cathedral of Our Lady
Catedral de Santa María (XIII-XVIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Cathedral of Our Lady

 The Cathedral of Our Lady
Catedral de Santa María (XIII-XVIII century)

 

 Burgos - Chapel of the Immaculate Conception

 Chapel of the Immaculate Conception
Capilla de la Concepcion (XV century)

 

 Burgos - Chapel of St. Nicholas

 Chapel of St. Nicholas
Capilla de San Nikolas (XIII century)

 Burgos - Chapel of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Chapel of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Capilla de la Natividad de Nuestra Senora (XVI century)

 

 Burgos - Chapel of the Annunciation

Chapel of the Annunciation
Capilla de Anunciacion (XIII century)

 

 Burgos - Chapel of St. Gregory

Chapel of St. Gregory
Capilla de San Grigorio (XIII century)

 

 Burgos - Chapel of St. Gregory

 Chapel of St. Gregory
Capilla de San Grigorio (XIII century)

 

Chapel of Connetables is distinguished by the presence of two tombstones - the constable (commander in chief) of Castile, Pedro Fernandez de Velasco (1425-1492) and his wife Mensia de Mendoza (1421-1500). The chapel was built on their money, just with the prospect of a subsequent burial. Sculptures were cut out much later and they reflect not the portrait resemblance, but the grandeur of the images.
It is interesting here that in those days, the grandees, who had the means and influence to do this, could provide themselves with such a privileged place of dwelling after death, in the main temple of the country (and with him, probably, some privileges in the afterlife :).
As for the personality of the constable himself, he was one of the most influential politicians of his time and took an active part in the intrigues accompanying the struggle for the throne of Enrique IV and his sister Isabella, moving from one camp to another. But, he make the right choice :) and joined the supporters of the future queen, for which, in fact, he got his title.

 

 Burgos - Chapel of Connetables

 The tombstones of the Countess of Aro Donja Mensia de Mendoza and her husband Don Pedro Fernandez de Velasco, Constable of Castile
Sepulcro de Condesa de Haro, Doña Mencía de Mendoza y D. Pedro Fernández de Velasco, condestable de Castilla

 

Sacristy - in the Catholic Church a place where the objects of worship and everything necessary for the preparation of priests for service are stored. In the Burgos cathedral, the sacristy was completely rebuilt in the 18th century in the style of rococo, having received as the main decoration a richly decorated dome. I still liked the chairs near the wall, each with an original painting.

 

 Burgos - Sacristy

Sacristy
Sacristía Mayor (XVIII century)

 

 Burgos - Sacristy
Sacristy
Sacristía Mayor (XVIII century)

 

The cloister (patio) is surrounded by a two-storeyed gallery, called, respectively, the upper and lower cloister (Claustro Alto and Claustro Bajo).
The niches of the galleries are occupied with sculptures and gravestones. The memorials are mainly dedicated to the buried canons that were not, of course, the rank-and-file ministers of the church, but they left no noticeable trace in the history either. Here is an interesting artistic component.

 

 Burgos - Golden Gate

 Golden Gate - entrance to the cloister
Puerta Dorada (XIII-XV century)

 

 Burgos - The Cloister

The Cloister
Claustro

 

 Burgos - Lower Cloister

Lower Cloister
Claustro Bajo

 

 Burgos - Lower Cloister

Lower Cloister
Claustro Bajo

 

 Burgos - The tombstone of Pedro Martínez de Aion

The tombstone of Pedro Martínez de Aion
Sepulcro de Pedro Martinez de Ayllon (XV century)

 

 Burgos - The tombstone of Pedro Martínez de Aion

The tombstone of Pedro Martínez de Aion
Sepulcro de Pedro Martinez de Ayllon (XV century)

 

The lower gallery ends with the chapel of St. Catalina, containing portraits of all the abbots of the cathedral, and a museum that did not seem particularly interesting to me, in comparison with the cathedral itself. In the sense that there is nothing special there, they simply collected the most valuable items.
 

 Burgos - Chapel of St. Catalina

Chapel of St. Catalina
Capilla de Santa Catalina (XIV century)

 

 Burgos - Chapel of St. Catalina

Chapel of St. Catalina
Capilla de Santa Catalina  (XIV century)

 

Near the entrance to the chapel is the chest of the national Spanish (or, still, Castilian) hero Sid Kampeodor.
Sid - Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar (1048? -1099) was a talented military commander, but in terms of moral qualities, to be honest, nothing special from the environment of the then-nobility did not stand out. His name was made by loud victories, incl. over the Moors (although for a very long time Sid served the Arab Emir of Zaragoza and defeated his Christian opponents). Well, another role played by the image of undeservedly offended - after in the quarrel defeated and was killed Sancho II, on whose side Rodrigo fought, the new King Alfonso VI, for obvious reasons, did not like Sid. In general, it's not even a matter of a specific person - the people needed a hero and Rodrigo was the best candidate.
To Burgos he is related, since he was born nearby, (in a family estate, 10 km from Burgos) and is buried in the Burgos cathedral (more precisely, he was reburied in 1911). The grave, by the way, is a big but not very prominent slab in the floor, in the center of the cathedral. It was possible to think of something more adventurous.

 

 Burgos - Sid Kampeador's Chest

Sid Kampeador's Chest
Cofre de Cid (XI century)

 

Church of St. Nicholas is on the same square as the cathedral. Such seemingly excessive is due to the fact that the cathedral was used for especially solemn services, and on ordinary days it was visited by noble families. The parish church was intended for all other believers.

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Nicholas

 Church of St. Nicholas
Iglesia de San Nicolas de Bari (XV century)

 

As in almost any Castilian city, Burgos has its own Plaza Mayor.

 

 Burgos - Plaza Mayor

 Plaza Mayor

 

In the palace of the constables, the same Pedro Fernandez de Velasco and his wife lived, the ashes of which rest in the corresponding chapel of the cathedral. The palace is also called the House of Cords - because of the decoration above the entrance.

 

 Burgos - House of the Cord - Palace of Constables

 House of the Cord - Palace of Constables
Casa del Cordón - Palacio de los Condestables (XV century)

 

 Burgos - House of the Cord - Palace of Constables

 House of the Cord - Palace of Constables
Casa del Cordón - Palacio de los Condestables (XV century)

 

Church of St. Lesmes is dedicated to the patron of the city. Despite the decent size, the church looks rather modest for a Gothic structure - decorations boil down to small turrets and a small rose window.
The church, although a parish, for a long time belonged to the monastery of St. John. The monastery was founded in 1091 and its first abbot was St.. Lesmes. In 1097 he died and was buried in the monastery chapel, instead of which, later the church was built.
Prefix to the name of the saint "Abad" is often found in Burgos - it means simply the abbot.

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Lesmes

 Church of St. Lesmes
Iglesia de San Lesmes Abad (XIV century)

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Lesmes

 Church of St. Lesmes
Iglesia de San Lesmes Abad (XIV century)

 

In the XIII century the monastery of St. John fell into decay (in 1400 there were only four monks). In 1537 there was a violent fire, which almost destroyed the monastery. The restoration continued until the beginning of the nineteenth century, when, as a result of secularization, monks were expelled, and buildings were used as barracks, prisons, etc. Now, what has survived is occupied by the museum.

 

 Burgos - Monastery of St. John

 Monastery of St. John
Monasterio de San Juan (XVI-XVIII century)

 

 Burgos - Monastery of St. John

 Monastery of St. John
Monasterio de San Juan (XI-XVI century)

 

Church of St. Giles was part of the city wall and was located next to the northern gate, called, respectively, the arch of St. Giles.

 

 Burgos - Church of St.Giles

 Church of St. Giles
Iglesia de San Jil Abad (XIII-XVI century)

 

 Burgos - Arch of St. Giles

Arch of St. Giles
Arco de San Jil (XIII-XVIII century)

 

The city wall is pretty well preserved, long fragments are found all over Burgos.

 

 Burgos - Tower of the Dona Lambra and the Jewish Gates

 The Tower of the Dona Lambra and the Jewish Gates
Torreon de dona Lambra y Puerta de la Juderia (XIII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - City Wall

 City Wall
Murallas (XIII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - City Wall

City Wall
Murallas (XIII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - The Gates of St. Stefan

The Gates of St. Stefan
Arco de San Esteban (XIII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - The Gates of St. Stefan

The Gates of St. Stefan
Arco de San Esteban (XIII-XIV century)

 

The walls protected residential quarters, but Burgos also had a real fortress, located, as expected, on a hill.
At the foot of this hill is the Church of St. Stefan is a massive Gothic structure with a bell tower, similar to a defensive tower. Apparently, during the siege the church was used as a kind of bastion.

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Stefan

 Church of St. Stefan
Iglesia de San Esteban (XII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Stefan

Church of St. Stefan
Iglesia de San Esteban (XII-XIV century)

 

The fortress of Burgos, in addition to its defensive function, was used as a royal castle. Inside, almost nothing remained. From what is, the most interesting is a well 62 meters deep, around which a tunnel for the stairs has been dug.

 

 Burgos - The fortress of Burgos

 The fortress of Burgos
Castillo (XII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - Well

 Well
Castillo (XII-XIV century)

 

 Burgos - View from the fortress

View from the fortress

 

 Burgos - View from the fortress.

View from the fortress

 

There are few old houses in Burgos. One of them is the house of the Cubes, which got its name because of an unusual design resembling the cubes placed on each other (usually, houses were built that they were longer in length than in height). It is assumed that on the first floor there was a stable, and above the living quarters.

 

 Burgos - House of the Cubes

House of the Cubes
Casa de los Cubos (XVI century)

 

Arch of Fernand Gonzalez - a monument established by the city authorities of Burgos at the end of the XVI century in honor of the first independent count of Castile, whose residence was in this place.

 

 Burgos - Arch of Fernand Gonzalez

 Arch of Fernand Gonzalez
Arco de Fernán González (XVI century)

 

Church of St. Agatha is famous as the place where Sid Kampeedor was forced to take an oath to Alphonse VI, in that he did not take part in the murder of his brother Sancho II. This event is perpetuated by a memorial plate. By the date of construction of the current church it is clear that it is not about her, but about her predecessor.

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Agatha

 Church of St. Agatha
Iglesia de Santa Agueda (XV-XVII century)

 

Surprisingly, in Burgos, compared to other large Castilian cities, not many monasteries have survived. One of them - Monastery of the Annunciation? a completely new one, the construction ended in 1920. The monastery church of St. Maria, despite such a short history, is considered a model of neo-Gothic. This church is almost the only thing that still belongs to the monastery, because there are very few nuns (but they are famous for their pastry :).

 

 Burgos - Monastery of the Annunciation

 Monastery of the Annunciation
Monasterio de la Visitación de Santa María (Convento de las Salesas) (XIX-XX century)

 

Across the road is the classical building of St. Jullian and St. Quirce, also named after the founder - the canon of the Burgos Cathedral, Don Pedro Barrantes and Alcantara.

 

 Burgos - The hospital of St. Jullian and St. Cyricus (Hospital Barrantes)

 The hospital of St. Jullian and St. Cyricus (Hospital Barrantes)
Hospital de San Julián y San Quirce (o de Barrantes) (XVI century)

 

 

All of the above is in the same part of the city as the cathedral, but there is something interesting on the other side of the river.

The hospital of the Immaculate Conception was built on the money of a charitable foundation founded by the city merchant Diego de Bernoui. Judging by the aristocratic prefix, the trader was not easy, but, still, this is an infrequent case - usually such institutions were funded by the church.

 

 Burgos - The hospital of the Immaculate Conception

 The hospital of the Immaculate Conception
Hospital de la Concepcion (XVI-XVII century)

 

Church of St. Kozma and Damian are quite typical for these places. In the photo, according to the color of the stone, it is very clearly seen that the oldest part is the apse, and the newest is the bell tower.

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Kozma and Damian

 Church of St. Kozma and Damian
Iglesia de San Cosme y San Damian (XV-XVII century)

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Kozma and Damian
Church of St. Kozma and Damian
Iglesia de San Cosme y San Damian (XV-XVII century)

The Institute of Cardinal Lopez de Mendoza was founded as a school of future clergymen. Actually the institute (with an agricultural bias) was formed in the middle of the XIX century. The above-mentioned Mendoza was the bishop-Cardinal of Burgos in 1529-1535 and came from a local noble family (in particular, was the grandson of the Countess of Mendoza, whose gravestone we saw in one of the chapels of the Cathedral, paired with the constable). The cardinal's name was given to the institute in 1957.

 Burgos - The Institute of Cardinal Lopez de Mendoza

 The Institute of Cardinal Lopez de Mendoza
Instituto de Ensenanza Secundaria "Cardinal Lopez de Mendoza" (XVI century)

 

The Church of Mercy was part of the Monastery. Now there is no monastery, and only a part of the old church survived - the rest was rebuilt in the XIX century Jesuits, who got the building.

 

 

 Burgos - Church of Mercy

Church of Mercy
Iglesia de la Merced (XV-XIX century)

 

The Augustinian monastery is considered to be the oldest in Burgos, because it seems that it was founded almost in the same year as the city. There are documentary evidence of its existence in the XII century. Preserved to our days - the club, the refectory, the pavement - the buildings of the XVI-XVII century. Now in the buildings around the former monastery and partly in it is the Chamber of Deputies of the provinces of Burgos.

 

 Burgos - Monastery of St. Augustine

 Monastery of St. Augustine
Monasterio de San Agustin (XVI-XVII century)

 

Nearby is another Augustinian monastery (female) of St. Dorothea, much better preserved, even with the functioning church. The church houses the graves of several bishops (XVI century).

 

 Burgos - Monastery of St. Dorothea

 Monastery of St. Dorothea
Convento de Santa Dorotea (XV century)

 

 Burgos - Monastery of St. Dorothea

 Monastery of St. Dorothea
Convento de Santa Dorotea (XV century)

 

Church of St. Peter and St. Felix until the XIX century belonged to the Hospitallers, then it was transferred to the local parish. In the middle of XX century the church was expanded, adding one more, neo-Gothic wing (there is now the main entrance). The oldest part of the church is the apse.

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Peter and St. Felix

 Church of St. Peter and St. Felix
Parroquia de San Pedro y San Felices (XIV-XX century)

 

 Burgos - Church of St. Peter and St. Felix

 Church of St. Peter and St. Felix
Parroquia de San Pedro y San Felices (XIV-XX century)

 

On the outskirts of the city (about half an hour walk from the center) there is a very significant historical object - the female Cistercians monastery of Las Huelgas .
In modern Spanish, the word "welgas" means "strike", but then this concept applied to the land - in Russian something like "under steam".
The abbey was founded in 1187 by King Alfonso VII, at the request of his wife, who tried, if not to equalize women's rights with men (yes, in the 12th century there were also feminists, although they were not called), at least give them , equal to the male, power over themselves like. As a result, the abbess of the monastery not only enjoyed unlimited secular power over more than fifty surrounding villages, but also issued licenses to the priests of dependent churches (preaching and accepting confession to women, however, was not allowed).
In this monastery one king (Pedro I) was born, several were crowned and many royalty are buried here.
Now the monastery, of course, is more a museum than a religious institution, but there are still nuns here (about a dozen). Traditionally, they live by baking buns with jam from fruits grown in gardens still belonging to the monastery.

 

 Burgos - The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas - the Church of St. Antony Abad

The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas - the Church of St. Antony Abad
Monasterio de Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas - Iglesia de San Antonio Abad (XII-XIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas

 The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas
Monasterio de Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas (XII-XIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas

 The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas
Monasterio de Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas (XII-XIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas

 The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas
Monasterio de Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas (XII-XIII century)

 

 Burgos - The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas

 The Royal Monastery of St. Maria Las Huelgas
Monasterio de Santa María la Real de Las Huelgas (XII-XIII century)

 

Burgos is by far one of the must-see cities in Castile. There are many sights, in order to view everything in detail you need at least a week.

 

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Tourist sights map of Burgos
Tourist sights map of Burgos

Map of Burgos
Map of Burgos

 


 

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