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Padua, Italy - attractions

 

 

It's easy to get In Padua by rail. The station is very close to the historic center.
The nearest to the station attraction is the Scrovegni Chapel - almost the main treasure of Padua. Surprisingly, I missed her. The chapel is located inside the park, and I did not look into. :( The building itself is unremarkable, moreover, from the photo it seems to be an absolute replica. The main thing in this chapel is Giotto's well-preserved frescoes. Getting inside is not so easy - groups of 25 people are run every 45 minutes. A preliminary record available on the site, and, and I think without this record there are practically no chances to visit the chapel.

The next attraction is the church of St. Philip and St. Jacob, better known as the Church of Erimitani, since the construction was carried out under the direction of the monk of the Order of Augustinian Fra Giovanni degli Eremitani. Actually the church  was intended for the monastery. The monastery was famous for staying in it many interesting  personalities, for example, Henry III Valois, Martin Luther, Petrarch. Almost nothing remained of the monastic buildings, they were completely rebuilt for the needs of the museum, which is now located there.
The church greatly suffered from the bombing of 1944, when the roof and part of the walls were completely destroyed. The building was restored after the war, but most of the interior decoration (especially frescoes) was lost.

 

 Padua Church of Erimitani
Church of Erimitani
Chiesa degli Eremitani (chiesa dei Santi Filippo e Giacomo) (XIV-XV century)

 

 Padua Church of Erimitani

Church of Erimitani
Chiesa degli Eremitani (chiesa dei Santi Filippo e Giacomo) (XIV-XV century)

 

 Padua Church of Erimitani

Church of Erimitani
Chiesa degli Eremitani (chiesa dei Santi Filippo e Giacomo) (XIV-XV century)

 

 Padua The Tomb of Jacopo II de Carrara with Petrarch's epitaph

Church of Erimitani. The Tomb of Jacopo II de Carrara with Petrarch's epitaph
Chiesa degli Eremitani. Tomba di Jacopo II da Carrara con epitaffio del Petrarca (XIV century)

 

 Padua Chapel Sanguinacci

Church of Erimitani. Chapel Sanguinacci
Chiesa degli Eremitani. La Capella Sanguinacci  (XIV century)

 

 Padua Apse with frescoes by Guariento di Arpo

Church of Erimitani. Apse with frescoes by Guariento di Arpo
Chiesa degli Eremitani. Abside con affreschi del Guariento di Arpo (XIV century)

 

Porta Altinate is one of the four main gates of medieval Padua. They were joined by a Roman bridge with the same name, obtained from the name of the city to which the road was heading. On both sides of the gate are short remains of the city walls.

 

 Padua Altinate  Gate

Altinate  Gate
Porta Altinate (XIV century)

 

Church of St. Simon and St. Judah Thaddeus is better known as the Church of St. Caetan, named Gaetano da Thiene - not a saint, but associated with the construction and decoration of the church. Previously, it was part of the monastery complex. A new church began to be built in 1582, on the site of the previous one destroyed, and already in 1588 it was consecrated.
Luxurious baroque decoration (which, by the way, critics of the time did not approve), appeared, incl. thanks to Raphael Savonarola, who took the place of the vice-rector of the monastery in 1692-1730. Just in case, this is not the other Savonarola (Girolamo), which many people remember as a passionate preacher and reformer of the church. Rafael Savonarola is not so famous. He is the author of a book describing the world, and, moreover, the book was a compilation and the most valuable thing in it for current scholars is a bibliographic list.
The monastery was secularized by Napoleonic laws in 1810, and the church became a parish. In 1929 all the monastic buildings were destroyed by fire, but the church practically did not suffer.

 

 Padua  Church of St. Caetan

Church of St. Caetan
Chiesa di San Gaetano (chiesa dei Santi Simone e Giuda) (XVI-XVIII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Caetan

Church of St. Caetan
Chiesa di San Gaetano (chiesa dei Santi Simone e Giuda) (XVI-XVIII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Caetan)

Church of St. Caetan
Chiesa di San Gaetano (chiesa dei Santi Simone e Giuda) (XVI-XVIII century)

 

Church of St. Sofia is one of the oldest Padua churches. The first mention in the documents was noted in 1123 - there are talking about the work on the completion of the church. But, at the same place earlier, probably, there was another church, the materials of which were used for the new construction - so some parts of the apse correspond to the times of the Carolingians. Traditions say that the first Christian church here was built on the ruins of the pagan (Roman) Temple of Apollo.

 

 Padua Church of St. Sofia

Church of St. Sofia
Parrocchia di Santa Sofia (XII-XV century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Sofia

Church of St. Sofia
Parrocchia di Santa Sofia (XII-XV century)

 

Minorite monastery with a hospital and the church of St. Francis of Assisi was built with funds from the local noble family Bonafari. Here the Bonafari spouses are buried, among other famous personalities, for example, the last duke of Mantua Charles Ferdinand Gonzaga-Nevers.

 

 Padua Monastery of St. Francis

Monastery of St. Francis
Convento di San Francesco (XV-XVII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Francis

Church of St. Francis
Chiesa di San Francesco Grande (XV-XVII century)

 

Directly opposite the monastery is the church of St. Margarita. The church was founded in 1198, but there was absolutely nothing left of that building, although there is no information about fires or destruction. Apparently, the "reconstruction", produced by the owners of the church in the 30s of the XVII century, meant a new building.

 

 Padua Church of St. Margarita

Church of St. Margarita
Chiesa di Santa Margherita (XVII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Margarita

Church of St. Margarita
Chiesa di Santa Margherita (XVII century)

 

Palace of Zabarella - a sample of home-fortress, with a tower and without any special decorations. In Italy, this is not common - usually the local rich built something gorgeous, with galleries and frescoes. However, most likely, such houses-fortresses were simply rebuilt more often in order to add convenience.

 

 Padua Palace of Zabarella

Palace of Zabarella
Palazzo Zabarella (XIV-XIX century)

 

The coffin of the legendary founder of Padua Antenor stands right on the square in the city center, opposite the prefecture. :) The legend went from Titus Livius, according to which, Padua was founded by the Trojan prince Antenor. Naturally, the city authorities liked this story very much, so when in 1274, they found the remains of a man with a sword, he was immediately announced as Antenor and a suitable sarcophagus for him was created . In 1985, the contents of the sarcophagus was investigated and the scientists decided that, with a high degree of probability, these were the remains of a 9th century Hungarian warrior who died during the invasion.

 

 Padua Tomb of Antenor

Tomb of Antenor
Tomba di Antenore (XIII century)

 

 Padua Tomb of Antenor

Tomb of Antenor
Tomba di Antenore (XIII century)

 

In the center of medieval Padua, was the market square. Now, by the way, the market is still here. True, the goods are a little different. :)
It was logical to accommodate the city administration here. The building, originally intended for judicial services, began to be built in 1172, exactly in the middle of the market square, and finished in 1219. As a result, the market was divided into two halves - Grass (piazza delle Erbe) and Fruit (piazza dei Frutti) square. At the beginning of the next century, extensions and loggias were added to the building. The reconstruction, which was required after the fire in 1420, united all the rooms under one roof, which is considered one of the largest roofs in Europe, not supported by columns (87 meters in length).

 

 Padua Della Ragione Palace

Della Ragione Palace
Palazzo della Ragione (XIII-XV century)

 

 Padua Della Ragione Palace

Della Ragione Palace
Palazzo della Ragione (XIII-XV century)

 

 Padua Della Ragione Palace

Della Ragione Palace
Palazzo della Ragione (XIII-XV century)

 

Nearby is another communal building, the most prominent part of which is the Anziani Tower, also known as Torre del Comune or Torre Bianca. Bianca - because she was whitewashed, unlike the neighboring Torre Rosa (which was not preserved). As for the first name - Anziani, it is synonymous with the word vecchio, i.e. "old". Probably mean the elders.
Legend has it that the tower, along with the palace, was transferred to the city by some of contactor.

 

 Padua Anziani Tower

Anziani Tower
Torre degli Anziani (XIII century)

 

 Padua Anziani Tower

Anziani Tower
Torre degli Anziani (XIII century)

 

The tower of Orologgio was built in the first half of the fourteenth century as the eastern gate of the palace in Carrarese. In 1428 they were decorated in the Gothic style and, then, equipped with an astronomical clock. In 1531 a large triumphal arch was added.
Astronomical clocks are the oldest mechanism of this type in the world. They were installed in 1344, then damaged by fire and restored, using original parts, in 1436.

 

 Padua Tower of Orologgio

Tower of Orologgio
Torre dell'Orologio (XIV-XVI century)

 

The House of the Great Council was built in 1496-1553. During Austrian rule, it became the headquarters of the Gran Guard (city military command), therefore it also has the name of the Gran Guardia.

 

 Padua House of the Great Council

House of the Great Council
Loggia del Consiglio (Loggia della Gran Guardia)  (XVI century)

 

According to legend, the money for the construction of the church of St. Clement in 5th century was sacrificed by the Christian communities, living in the Venetian Islands. The first mention in the documents refers to 1190. The building was rebuilt many times. The rose window, surrounded by terracotta decor, dates from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the rest of the portal is much later.

 

 Padua Church of St. Clement

Church of St. Clement
Chiesa di San Clemente (XII-XVIII century)

 

Piazza Duomo, under the project of reconstruction of the cathedral in the 16th century, was planned to be transformed into a square surrounded by a single complex of buildings, including the Episcopal palace, the Cathedral itself and the baptistery. In general, they are now really connected, but there was no uniformity - every building is absolutely different from the one next.
Entrance to the Cathedral is free, to the Baptistery (where you can admire the frescoes of the fourteenth century) and the Episcopal Palace (with the treasury of the Cathedral) is paid.

 

 Padua Cathedral and Baptistery

Cathedral and Baptistery
Duomo di Padua, Battistero

 

Duomo Padua - The Cathedral Basilica of Santa Maria Assunta, has been the center of the diocese since at least the fourth century. The current building dates to the sixteenth century and was built under the direction of Michelangelo Buonarroti
The facade of the Cathedral is very modest, though, he remained unfinished. According to the project, a classical pediment was supposed, supported by six Corinthian half-columns.

 

 Padua Cathedral

Cathedral
Duomo di Padua (basilica cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta)  (XVI-XVIII century)

 

 Padua Cathedral

Cathedral
Duomo di Padua (basilica cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta)  (XVI-XVIII century)

 

 Padua Cathedral

Cathedral
Duomo di Padua (basilica cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta)  (XVI-XVIII century)
 

The Baptistery is older than the Cathedral. Perhaps he was part of the previous church, which is why his appearance is so not consistent with the Duomo's view.

 

 Padua Baptistery of St. John the Baptist

Baptistery of St. John the Baptist
Battistero della Cattedrale di San Giovanni Battista  (XIII-XIV century)

 

The Episcopal palace now houses a museum (Museo Diocesano). The building itself is known from the eighth century, but, naturally, since then it has been rebuilt many times, the last time in the twentieth century.

 

 Padua Episcopal palace

Episcopal palace
Palazzo vescovile (VIII-XX century)

 

On the other side of the Piazza Duomo are the Arch of Vallaresso and the Palace del Monti. The triumphal arch here is set in honor of one of the town governors (Alvize Vallaresso), who was appointed to Padua in the midst of the plague, and, having taken the necessary measures, managed to stop the epidemic.

 

 Padua Arch of Vallaresso and Palace del Monti

Arch of Vallaresso and Palace del Monti
Arco Vallaresso (XVII century) y Palazzo del Monte (XVI century)

 

The Church of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary was part of the monastery complex of the Servites (Order of the Servants of the Virgin Mary) - hence the addition of dei Servi. The columns of the portico were taken from the Chapel of the Ark (XIV century). The main treasure -  is the 14th century polychrome statue in the altar, early mistakenly attributed to Donatello.

 

 Padua Church of St. Maria dei Servi

Church of St. Maria dei Servi
Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Servi (XIV-XVIII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Maria dei Servi

Church of St. Maria dei Servi
Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Servi (XIV-XVIII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Maria dei Servi

Church of St. Maria dei Servi
Chiesa di Santa Maria dei Servi (XIV-XVIII century)

 

In Padua, there is a castle of the former rulers of the city - Carrarese, but it is impossible to get there, and it will not even be possible to take a picture - access is closed on all sides. All that can be seen is a part of the tower.

 

 Padua Castle of Carrarese

Castle of Carrarese
Castello Carrarese (XIII-XVIII century)

 

Not far from the castle is the Church of St. Thomas Becket, with a very modest facade and very large inside. A closer look reveals the Gothic bell tower and a decent-sized dome. :)

 

 Padua Church of St. Thomas Becket

Church of St. Thomas Becket
Chiesa di S. Tommaso Becket (XVII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Thomas Becket

Church of St. Thomas Becket
Chiesa di S. Tommaso Becket (XVII century)

 

 Padua Church of St. Thomas Becket

Church of St. Thomas Becket
Chiesa di S. Tommaso Becket (XVII century)

 

I was in Padua on the road and in half a day I didn’t have time to look at everything. The city deserves a few days of thorough study.

 

 

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